Mint brings shared e-scooters to Bratislava

People need a smartphone and credit card to rent electric scooters.

Bratislava residents can use Mint's shared electric kick scooters.Bratislava residents can use Mint's shared electric kick scooters. (Source: Segway)

The growing popularity of electric scooters has recently reached Bratislava, and now residents can use shared electric scooters as well.

Read also:Municipal policemen get electric scooters in Bratislava Read more 

The Mint service, run by SoftGate Systems, unexpectedly began to operate in Slovakia’s capital, as reported by the Trend weekly.

It is the first application offering this means of transport to the public in Slovakia, bringing Segway Ninebot ES2 models to Bratislava.

How does it work?

E-scooters are randomly placed within the wider city centre of Bratislava.

People must download the Mint app and register by using their phone number. In addition, they must register a credit card.

Once a rider scans a QR code, he/she pays €1 as a starting fee; one minute costs €0.15. Those using an e-scooter for a day will pay €30.

The app also reminds people to use helmets and avoid pavements by using bike paths.

Read also:Where to rent or charge an ebike in Bratislava Read more 

Fines

Users will pay a fine of €30 if they park incorrectly, in the middle of a pavement or near a hydrant. They will also be fined if they damage the e-scooter, Trend wrote.

If the battery falls under 20 percent, users will pay a fine of €20. Users will pay up to €900 for a lost e-scooter.

Users may even be allowed to charge e-scooters at home, but this service is not yet available in Bratislava.

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