SPECTACULAR SLOVAKIA PODCAST

Gemer: The poorest but spectacular region remains undiscovered

Explore the region with US graduate Hannah Falchuk. She spent one year in Revúca, one of the region's centres.

Cyclists ride through the Great Plain (Veľká lúka) in the Muránska planina national park, central Slovakia. Tourists can rent an e-bike in the village of Muráň, which lies in the national park.Cyclists ride through the Great Plain (Veľká lúka) in the Muránska planina national park, central Slovakia. Tourists can rent an e-bike in the village of Muráň, which lies in the national park.(Source: TASR)

Revúca, Rimavská Sobota, and Rožňava. These are three centres of the historical Gemer Region in the southeast of central Slovakia. The whole region is most “famous” for having the highest unemployment in the country.

While young people are prone to leaving for a better future, American graduate Hannah Falchuk, featured on Spectacular Slovakia this week, went there to teach English. She spent one year at a grammar school in Revúca.

Although there is not much to see in the downtown of the city, aside from one of the first Slovak-language grammar schools on the territory of Slovakia, the surrounding rural area is a marvellous place to wander through.

Listen to this week's episode:

Hannah will take listeners to Revúca and also the town of Jelšava with its Coburg manor house. Also, tourists should not skip the picturesque village of Muráň and its popular pottery and the delicious and sweet pastry, muránske buchty.

Hannah will tell us more about the Muráň Castle and its legends. The castle stands on Cigánka (Gypsy), which is a cliff above the village of Muráň. Listeners will learn, in the podcast, why the cliff was named like this.

Gemer is also known for the Muránska planina national park (National Park Muráň Plateau), the youngest and one of the smallest national parks in Slovakia. Not only caves but also semi-wild horses can be found here. Hannah sees it as a great place for hiking, but tourists can rent an e-bike in the village of Muráň to reach the castle as well.

Towards the end of this week's episode, we will get into two unique caves, which are still within the borders of the Gemer Region – Ochtinská aragonitová jaskyňa (Ochtiná Aragonite Cave) and Domica, both in the Rožňava District.

Spectacular Slovakia will also unveil why there are railway tunnels which have never been completed. These include Slavošovský tunel (Slavošovce Tunnel) and Koprášsky tunel (Kopráš Tunnel).

After all, Gemer may be Slovakia's poorest region, but it is rich in a number of diverse experiences, which many have yet to discover.

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