Lidl launches online shop in Slovakia

The retail chain will not sell food online though.

Lidl in BratislavaLidl in Bratislava (Source: Sme)

The Lidl supermarket will launch an online shop in Slovakia on October 7. It will sell consumer goods, the chain is not considering launching an online food shop for now in Slovakia, the Denník E daily reported.

“In our view, an online food shopis an economically unfeasible model at the moment,” managing director of Lidl, Matúš Gala, told Denník E.

Besides the online shop, there will be a new digital programme for Lidl Plus customers with weekly discounts, vouchers, lottery tickets, online leaflets and searching for shops. Such an programme works in Poland and Austria, for example.

Foreign online shops also offer food

In the Czech Republic, Lidl has run an online hop since 2017, without food as well. The Czech branch of the company was the first in the central and eastern Europe region to launch an online shop.

Read also:Popular retailers are striving to be more eco-friendly Read more 

In Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands Lidl offers food with a long shelf life online.

Lidl entered the Slovak market 15 years ago when the chain opened 14 stores. Today, it has 137 shops in the Slovakia, three logistics centres and employs more than 4,800 people.

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