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German film climbs to the festival's top

A RECORD number of 5,500 visitors came to the 5th international Mountains and City 2004 film festival, which ran from April 22 to 25. Of the 40 films from 12 different countries, the international jury, led by the Polish climber and publisher Aleksander Lwow, awarded the Grand Prix to the German film The Race by Uli Wiesmeier for "an original story, creative contribution, and humorous combination of two of the festival's main themes".

A RECORD number of 5,500 visitors came to the 5th international Mountains and City 2004 film festival, which ran from April 22 to 25. Of the 40 films from 12 different countries, the international jury, led by the Polish climber and publisher Aleksander Lwow, awarded the Grand Prix to the German film The Race by Uli Wiesmeier for "an original story, creative contribution, and humorous combination of two of the festival's main themes".

In the festival's four categories, divided according to the themes rock, water, air, and earth, the jury awarded Josh Lowell for his Psicobloc (USA), Bill Heath for Pororoca: Surfing the Amazon (Germany), Graham Saunders-Griffith for Parahawking (GB), and Michael Brown for Farther than the Eye Can See (USA), respectively. The Shared Flight by Pole Miroslaw Dembinski won the V4 Award, and Slovak Pavol Barabáš received the Best Slovak Film Award for his documentary The Tatras: A Mystery, also selected as the best film by the audience.

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