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INEKO: Government keeping only popular promises

The Government is meeting pledges that are popular rather than beneficial for the country, the INEKO institute for economic and social reforms said on March 3.

The Government is meeting pledges that are popular rather than beneficial for the country, the INEKO institute for economic and social reforms said on March 3.

"The ruling parties are meeting pledges by just under one half. Pursuant to pre- and post-election promises and plans in their manifestos, they have halted the privatisation of strategic companies, reined in the growth of energy prices, put conditions for state support for domestic and foreign investors on the same legal footing and agreed on the completion of two units at the Mochovce nuclear power plant (Nitra region) in order to secure future self-sufficiency for the country in electricity generation," Gabriel Šipoš of INEKO said.

On the other hand, after 18 months in power, the governing parties have failed to make further improvements to the quality of the business environment, introduce a special tax on monopolies, lower excise tax on fuels, or demonstrate the efficient functioning of state enterprises.

The Government in economic policy is meeting pledges that are popular but criticised by experts, continued Šipoš, who said that a case in point is the downward pressure on energy prices and the halting of the privatisation of strategic companies.

"Conversely, it is mainly performing poorly on promises highly rated by the professional fraternity, such as an improvement in the business environment or the diversification of energy resources." TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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