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Witness: Tupý murder was brutal

A NEW, unidentified witness has come forward claiming to have seen the murder of student Daniel Tupý in November 2005. His testimony, according to which Tupý and a group of students were attacked by at least six people, was obtained by the Sme daily.

A NEW, unidentified witness has come forward claiming to have seen the murder of student Daniel Tupý in November 2005. His testimony, according to which Tupý and a group of students were attacked by at least six people, was obtained by the Sme daily.

Police have so far charged just four attackers: Richard H., Dávid V., Ján S., and Marián G. Following Tupý's death, Marián G. committed suicide. The witness said there were two more people present during the attack. He also added that Richard H. had knives in both hands and stabbed Tupý, who had a guitar case next to him, in the back. He described the attack as brutal and determined. The witness said he saw the boy's face and later recognised him from images in the media as Tupý. It is not clear from the testimony whether the new witness was one of the attackers.

In February, police accused Richard H. of having murdered Tupý. Dávid V., Ján S. and Marián G. were alleged to have helped him. Three of the accused are in custody, because of a risk that they might try to influence witnesses, according to the court. Tupý was murdered on November 4, 2005, at Tyršovo Embankment in Bratislava. Originally, it was believed to have been an attack by extremists, but subsequent investigation suggested Bratislava underworld connections.

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