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Lipšic: Harabin should have apologised for lying in parliament

Opposition KDH MP Daniel Lipšic said on September 10 that Justice Minister Štefan Harabin should have apologised in parliament for lying several times to MPs.

Opposition KDH MP Daniel Lipšic said on September 10 that Justice Minister Štefan Harabin should have apologised in parliament for lying several times to MPs.

Instead, Harabin (HZDS) apologised to parliament for his inappropriate words when facing the vote of no-confidence, the TASR newswire wrote.

"I find it pathetic,” Lipšic said. “He was reading speech when he said it, which means that it wasn't a result of mental strain, but a premeditated act that attests to his character and the corners of his soul."

Lipšic said it was not vulgar outbursts and anti-Semitic innuendos that he regarded as the fundamental problem, but the minister's alleged confidential relations with the boss of an Albanian drug gang.

"The fundamental question is whether we, and (Prime Minister) Robert Fico really don't mind that such a man is his deputy in government," he said.

Lipšic added that he expected low blows from HZDS leader Vladimír Mečiar and the justice minister and was ready to face them. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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