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Government okays deepening of Slovak-Israeli cultural cooperation

Slovakia is to offer a one-year scholarship each year to an Israeli post-graduate or doctoral student, while similar support will be granted to Slovak students interested in studying at universities in Israel, it was announced on September 10, the TASR newswire wrote.

Slovakia is to offer a one-year scholarship each year to an Israeli post-graduate or doctoral student, while similar support will be granted to Slovak students interested in studying at universities in Israel, it was announced on September 10, the TASR newswire wrote.

A programme oriented at culture, education and science in 2008-12 that lays out the conditions for mutual cooperation in the field of youth, post-graduate and doctoral education was approved by the Slovak Government on the same day.

The scholarship will form part of an exchange programme of experts in international, cultural and music festivals, archaeologists, restoration specialists, antiquarian book and artifact specialists and archivists. Slovak history teachers will be able to attend a three-week course focusing on the Holocaust and the history of anti-Semitism organised by the Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Authority Yad Vashem in Jerusalem.

The programme also creates the opportunity for further cooperation between the Slovak Jewish Culture Museum in Bratislava, Yad Vashem, and Beth Hatefutsoth - the Nahum Goldmann Museum of the Jewish Diaspora in Tel Aviv. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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