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Government okays agreements facilitating visa-free regime with USA

The Slovak government on September 29 passed two documents focusing on the war on terrorism that should bring Slovakia closer to a non-visa agreement with the U.S.

The Slovak government on September 29 passed two documents focusing on the war on terrorism that should bring Slovakia closer to a non-visa agreement with the U.S.

An agreement on exchanging information about known and suspected terrorists will enable suspicious individuals to be screened. The information from the screening process will include names, nicknames, date of birth, passport numbers, nationality and citizenship.

The U.S. will survey the information through Terrorist Screening Centre (TSC) and Slovakia through the Interior Ministry's Police Corps Headquarters (PPZ). Both sides will update the information regularly - TSC once a week and PZZ once a month.

The second agreement concerns intensifying the co-operation between Slovakia and the U.S. in the fight against crime and crime. This agreement will enable a search of identification data, such as fingerprints, DNA and other personal data. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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