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President signs several bills into law

President Ivan Gašparovič signed six bills that amend some laws related to euro adoption in Slovakia from the beginning of next year.

President Ivan Gašparovič signed six bills that amend some laws related to euro adoption in Slovakia from the beginning of next year.

The laws were drafted by the Interior Ministry, Finance Ministry, Labour Ministry, Health Ministry, Education Ministry and the Defence Ministry, the SITA newswire wrote. The laws valid so far stated sums in Slovak crowns, whereas these sums will be stated in euros. The laws will come into force as of January 1, when the euro becomes the official currency in Slovakia.

The president also signed the amendment to the Commercial Code, obliging any debtor late with settlement of a financial obligation or part thereof to pay interest on late payments of the relevant sum, as agreed upon in the contract. If interest on late payments was not agreed upon in the contract, the debtor will be obliged to pay interest on the late payment based on a provision of the Civil Code.

The president also signed a draft amendment to the law on asylum. The aim of the amendment is to harmonise Slovak asylum law with EU asylum legislation. Foreigners who do not succeed in asylum proceedings will have the opportunity to ask the Center of Legal Aid for legal assistance. SITA

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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