President signs law with stricter rules for sports and other events

President Ivan Gašparovič on November 24 signed a new law on organising public sports and tourism events that is designed to improve safety and the behaviour of fans at sports stadiums, especially at football and ice-hockey matches. The law, drawn up by the Education Ministry, extends organisers' responsibilities and powers, lays down stricter rules for spectators, and introduces new tasks for local authorities. Events will have to be announced at least seven days before they are scheduled to take place. If the event could involve risks, the organisers will have to ask the local authorities and the local police to help them to maintain public order. Event organisers will be obliged to plan safety measures, set up organiser's services and protect public buildings. They will also have to ensure that the event doesn't diverge from its original purpose. They will be expected to interrupt or close down events if public order is breached. Organisers will be authorised to ensure that people attending their events aren't carrying guns, fireworks, alcohol or drugs. They will be allowed to exclude intoxicated people and expel those who behave improperly. Events involving risk must be monitored by a camera system.

President Ivan Gašparovič on November 24 signed a new law on organising public sports and tourism events that is designed to improve safety and the behaviour of fans at sports stadiums, especially at football and ice-hockey matches. The law, drawn up by the Education Ministry, extends organisers' responsibilities and powers, lays down stricter rules for spectators, and introduces new tasks for local authorities.

Events will have to be announced at least seven days before they are scheduled to take place. If the event could involve risks, the organisers will have to ask the local authorities and the local police to help them to maintain public order. Event organisers will be obliged to plan safety measures, set up organiser's services and protect public buildings. They will also have to ensure that the event doesn't diverge from its original purpose. They will be expected to interrupt or close down events if public order is breached.

Organisers will be authorised to ensure that people attending their events aren't carrying guns, fireworks, alcohol or drugs. They will be allowed to exclude intoxicated people and expel those who behave improperly. Events involving risk must be monitored by a camera system.

Slovak National Party (SNS) caucus leader Rafael Rafaj pushed through a provision stating that the police will have the authority to cancel an event if it is deemed to pose a direct threat to public order or the health of those attending. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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