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Non-traditional sports find their feet in Slovakia

SLOVAKIA is a nation keen on sports with a zest for individual disciplines fuelled by the sound results of Slovak athletes.

American football in Slovakia. (Source: Courtesy of Bratislava Monarchs)

This was proven in 2002 when Slovak ice hockey players became the world champions as well as with each gold medal won by white-water athletes, or recently by the excellent performance of cyclist Peter Sagan at the Tour de France.

Yet along with broadly popular sports like hockey, soccer or cycling there are many sports that do not have such a deep-rooted tradition here in Slovakia. In spite of this, Slovak athletes have been achieving sound results in them or practicing them either to improve their health or to just have a good time. There are teams playing rugby, American football as well as lacrosse, baseball and ball hockey, in which Slovaks actually defended their position of world masters in late June. Many young people train in martial arts to keep fit and get rid of stress. New trends in fitness, such as crossfit and street workout, are closely followed in Slovakia, too.

Read also: Read also:American football catching on in Slovakia

What history do these sports have in Slovakia? How popular are they in Slovakia and what is their potential and ambitions? To find answers to these questions The Slovak Spectator has prepared a series of articles about less traditional sports, at least from the Slovak point of view. 

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