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Kollár reportedly has gangland ties

Chair of Sme Rodina (We Are Family) considers the documents received by the Sme daily, which allege his links to gangland figures, to be an attempt to discredit him.

Boris Kollár(Source: SME)

BORIS Kollár, leader of the Sme Rodina party which will hold 11 seats in the new parliament, was probably monitored by the intelligence service in the past for his alleged contacts with gangland figures. This stems from the documents Sme obtained.

Two documents, marked as reports of the former Office for the Protection of the Constitution and Democracy, are dated September and October 1990. They have the same structure as reports made by the communist-era secret police ŠtB before 1989. After the Velvet Revolution the Office was responsible for counter-intelligence tasks and operated under the federal Interior Ministry, Sme reported in its March 9 issue.

Read also: Read also:Our Family and the skeletons in its closet

The report from October 1990 relates to the activities of then illicit money-changer Peter Steinhübel, who later became one of the bosses of organised crime in Bratislava. He was murdered in August 1999. Three months later, another organised crime figure, Roman Deák, who is also mentioned in the documents, was killed. According to the documents, Steinhübel was involved in drug trafficking. To organise transport, he appointed his flunkeys Roman Deák, Boris Kolár and Ján Daniš who, according to the documents, “deal with the illegal exchange of money”, Sme reports.

The authenticity or veracity of the documents cannot be proved. Though the name Kolár is spelled with only one “l” (unlike the name of Sme Rodina’s chair), this may have been an error on the part of the person who prepared the documents. The residence of the man mentioned in documents was in Palisády in Bratislava, where Sme Rodina’s Kollár lived at the time, according to Sme.

The documents are lies, Kollár says

Kollár told Sme that he was seeing the documents for the first time and called the suspicions of drug trafficking nonsense. When asked about his relationship to Deák and Steinhübel, he told the daily that he knew them when they were children. Kollár has already confirmed that they were doing business together after the fall of the communist regime, but they allegedly stopped this in 1991, Sme wrote.

Meanwhile Kollár held a press conference on March 9, where he described the allegations as lies.

“I was never involved in that and have never touched it,” Kollár said, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

He expects attacks on him to continue in order to cause a split in the movement’s caucus. His Sme Rodina party thinks that oligarchs behind the Smer party are behind the attacks. The movement is ready to endure them, said Kollár, insisting on his support for a rightist government and his rejection of Smer.

The members of Sme Rodina also expressed their support for Kollár at the press conference, Sme wrote.

Topic: Election


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