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Sieť continues falling in polls

Only six parties would make it to the parliament in late April, without coalition Sieť.

(Source: TASR)

If the parliamentary elections were held in the final week of April, the most voters would support the strongest party Smer. It would receive 30.7 percent of the vote, resulting in 56 parliamentary seats. This stems from a poll carried out by the Polis agency for the SITA newswire between April 22 and 29 on 1,502 respondents.

Second would be Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) supported by 14.5 percent (26 seats), followed by the Slovak National Party with 12.2 percent (22 seats). Also far-right Kotleba – People’s Party Our Slovakia (ĽSNS) would make it to the house with 9.8 percent (18 seats), as well as the Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) with 9.5 percent (17 seats) and Most-Híd with 6 percent (11 seats).

Of the current parliamentary parties, two would fail to pass the 5-percent threshold. Sme Rodina of Boris Kollár would win the support of only 4.2 percent of voters, while Sieť would get only 2 percent, SITA reported.

The poll also shows that 60 percent of respondents would cast their ballot. While 14 percent said they would not vote, 26 percent of respondents were undecided.

In addition, most respondents (35 percent) said they trust SNS the most. It is followed by Smer with 34.6 percent, SaS with 21.9 percent and Most-Híd with 20.7 percent. OĽaNO is trusted by only 13 percent of respondents, as well as ĽSNS. About 5.5 percent of respondents said they trust the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH), while 5 percent trust Sme Rodina. Only 4.2 percent of respondents said they trust Sieť and 2.5 percent trust Party of Hungarian Coalition (SMK), SITA reported.

On the other hand, respondents trust the least the ruling Smer party (32.1 percent), followed by ĽSNS with 21.5 percent and OĽaNO with 19 percent.

Topic: Election


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