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Police raid Bašternák premises

The raid was linked to the residential complex Bonaparte, where PM Fico also rents a flat.

A police car standing in front of the residential complex on Tupého Street.(Source: TASR)

Police raided the premises of well-known businessman Ladislav Bašternák, suspected of tax frauds, on the morning of February 14. Police cars left the businessman’s villa before 9:00, the Aktuality.sk website wrote.

The prosecutor’s office later confirmed to the Denník N daily that the raid was connected to the residential complex Bonaparte, where PM Robert Fico also rents an apartment. However, it refused to provide more details due to the ongoing investigation.

The case goes back to June 2016, when Jozef Rajtár of Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) submitted a criminal lawsuit against the building. The police at first dismissed it, but the prosecutor ordered them to deal with it, Denník N wrote.

Read also: Read also:Businessman Bašternák explains origin of property

A police car was also parked in front of the residential complex on Tupého Street in Bratislava, where several of Bašternák’s firms reside. No police officers were seen close to the building so it is unclear whether they also raided those premises, the SITA newswire reported.

The police raided the businessman’s villa and the residential complex on Tupého Street already last June. At the time, they spent some four hours there. They came to take the books of his companies, also taking away the computer. They subsequently carried out a house search at the accountant's, Aktuality.sk wrote.

The police and the prosecutor’s office investigated Bašternák at the end of last year, scrutinising whether and how he could earn €12 million and whether his property is legal. Bašternák delivered his explanation of his property’s origin to the police on January 19, 2017.

Topic: Corruption & scandals


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