Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Inspectors to focus on firms with foreign staff

Scrutiny follows media report by Serbian journalist concerning conditions in a Galanta-based plant.

Labour Minister Ján Richter(Source: TASR)

The Labour Ministry will pay more attention to companies with foreign staff. The decision comes in the wake of a recent report by a Serbian journalist who worked incognito for three months in allegedly dire conditions at the Samsung plant in Galanta (Trnava region), the TASR newswire reported.

“Inspections are being carried out routinely, but we’re now focusing mainly on companies with foreign staff, particularly from countries [outside the EU], as it seems that the problem there is the most pronounced,” said Labour Minister Ján Richter on February 20, as quoted by TASR.

Serbian reporter Dragan Krsnik, in a story published in weekly magazine Nedeljnik in mid-February, claimed that he had worked at Samsung in Galanta without a proper work permit in what he called slave-like conditions and for a woeful salary. Officially, close to 6,000 Serbian nationals currently work in Slovakia, most of them via staff leasing agencies.

The Labour Ministry wants to see foreigners working in Slovakia only legally and in conditions corresponding to the Slovak Labour Code, Richter said.

Having carried out checks at almost 24,000 companies last year, the ministry’s inspectorate discovered 1,331 companies that were employing almost 3,000 people illegally, including many foreigners: 138 Serbs, 51 Ukrainians, 16 Vietnamese and six Macedonians.

“Most of the violations, in some [companies] as many as 90 percent, concerned staff leasing agencies,” said Richter, as quoted by TASR, adding that such agencies will now become the focus of particular scrutiny.

Richter also announced that he is due to discuss the situation with Serbian Ambassador to Slovakia Šani Dermaku.

“There could be hundreds of Serbian nationals employed illegally in Slovakia,” the minister said, as quoted by TASR.

The two countries have signed agreements concerning social issues that could be expanded in order to encompass cooperation and exchange information between the Slovak and Serbian labour inspectorates, Richter noted.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Czech PM files lawsuit against Slovakia at ECHR

Czech Premier Andrej Babiš sues his homeland in the European Court for Human Rights in connection with records proving his collaboration with the communist-era secret police.

Andrej Babiš

Revitalised industrial building offers work, entertainment and housing

Mlynica is an excellent example of successful conversion of unused industrial building.

Mlynica

Youngest Slovak village is a "communist dream come true” Photo

Dedina Mládeže (The Youth Village) was a mere experiment during the communist era. Now, the still inhabited village has morphed into an open-air museum.

Dedina Mládeže

What are the reasons behind low wages in Slovakia?

The average wage costs per Slovak employee accounts for only 44 percent of the EU average.