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Wizz Air to boost flights to Bratislava

The Hungarian low-cost airline announced several new flights connecting the Slovak capital with more European cities.

(Source: SITA)

Wizz Air – the biggest low-cost airline in central and eastern Europe – is adding new flights and lines not just at the beginning of the summer season but year-round, the Trend weekly wrote on its website on March 1.

Most recently, it has opened a new line between Bratislava and the Romanian city of Cluj, to fly two times a week from March 10. Wizz Air will operate flights from the Bosnian-Herzegovina city of Tuzla to the Slovak capital two times a week as well, and in mid-June a third flight will be added.

In the last week of June, Wizz Air plans to open a line connecting Bratislava and Warsaw four times a week – not to the low-cost airport Modlin but to the main Warsaw airport of Frederic Chopin.

From July 16 on, the Hungarian airline operator decided to boost flights between Macedonian capital Skopje and Bratislava to four times a week, instead of two. It will add a fourth airplane to its Skopje base. Beginning at the end of August, flights to Kiev will also be boosted, from two to four times weekly.

Apart from the Macedonian community in Vienna, the Skopje connection also opens up lesser known Macedonia to Slovak tourists, Tomáš Kika of the Weber Shandwick agency representing Wizz Air in Slovakia told the Trend.sk website.

At end of August, the Hungarian airline will fly 17 times a day to five foreign airports – and as it plans to expand its fleet, it may add some more new flights later in the year.

Wizz Air also flies from Košice to three British airports, and from Poprad to London.

Topic: Airlines


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