Two Syrians from Germany arrested in Slovakia for smuggling migrants

They face 10 years in prison if convicted.

Migration crisis was one of causes for the rise in conspiracies and fake or hybrid news; illustrative stock photoMigration crisis was one of causes for the rise in conspiracies and fake or hybrid news; illustrative stock photo(Source: AP/TASR)

The Slovak police have pressed charges of human smuggling against two Syrian nationals with temporary stays in Germany who were caught attempting to smuggle a 23-year old-Syrian woman with two children through the Rajka-Čunovo crossing at the Hungarian-Slovak border near Bratislava last week, the TASR newswire reported.

The police discovered that the Syrian woman and the children aged four and one had been registered as asylum-seekers in Hungary. The two alleged human smugglers, Ahmed A. and Daham A., last week picked her and the children up in front of an asylum facility in Hungary with the intention of smuggling them through Slovakia to Austria, said Slovak Police Corps spokesperson Denisa Baloghová.

The two Syrians were taken into custody and could spend as many as 10 years in prison if convicted. Meanwhile, the Syrian woman and the children have been placed in a transitory facility for migrants, pending their return to Hungary.

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Theme: Migration crisis


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