Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

UPDATED: 20. JUN 2017, AT 23:45

UPDATED: Antimonopoly Office stops investigation of presidency orders

The Foreign Affairs Ministry welcomes the decision, but the ethics watchdog says the scrutiny lacked depth.

the Slovak EU Council Presidency (Source: Jozef Jakubčo)

The Antimonopoly Office (PMÚ) halted the investigation of competitions for some events organised in connection with Slovakia’s Presidency of the EU Council, which took place during the second half of 2016.

“This means that the office did not find any violation of the law on the protection of economic competition when scrutinising the available documents and information,” the Foreign Affairs Ministry wrote on its Facebook profile.

The decision disproves the claims of “suspicious orders” and allegedly non-transparent competitions for events linked to the presidency, the ministry said.

The Foreign Affairs Ministry was referring to the statements of former employee Zuzana Hlávková and two of her former colleagues, who had reported on overpriced orders and fictitious tender linked to the EU Council presidency.

The ethics watchdog Transparency International Slovensko (TIS) meanwhile responded that the PMÚ has not scrutinised the orders in depth.

Read also: Read also:TIS: More people trust whistleblower Hlávková than Foreign Ministry

It also pointed to the fact that the ministry is refusing to publish all the documents concerned with the competition to choose the organiser of the cultural events linked to the EU Council presidency. The ministry had even refused to give all necessary documents to the PMÚ. Although it eventually received the papers, the names of the companies that allegedly “competed” with the winner of the order to prepare the ceremonial introduction of the presidency’s logo, the agency Evka, were concealed, TIS informed.

“Can we even believe that the Foreign Affairs Ministry gave complete documents to the PMÚ when the office had to repeatedly ask for a complete set of the materials to be scrutinised?” TIS asked.

The whistleblowers who pointed to the dubious competitions meanwhile persist with their claims that the winners were chosen in advance and the competition was only for effect.

Topic: EU presidency


This article is also related to other trending topics: Corruption & scandals

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.