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Businesses want schools to be more eager about dual education

Prepared amendment should motivate vocational schools to collaborate more.

Pupils should learn directly in firms. (Source: TASR)

Companies expect vocational schools to be more motivated to enter the system of dual education following changes proposed by the Education Ministry.

The Association of Employers Unions and Associations (AZZZ) expects that schools will not see a reduction in the per-capita finances they receive from the state. Under the current system, a school that participates in the dual education system receives less money for its expenses.

“We are pushing for certain system changes in dual education,” Andrej Hutta of AZZZ told the TASR newswire, adding that the philosophy is “not to punish schools who do dual education”. As soon as schools are motivated to participate in the system, the interest of students will follow, he says.

The law on vocational education should be amended next year, with the changes projected to become valid by September 2018, according to the ministry’s state secretary Oľga Nachtmannová.

Nachtmannová believes that businesses realise dual education is a way to eliminate some of the negatives in the labour market. Many companies who have not yet participated, including small and medium-sized enterprises, are becoming more willing to enter the dual education system.

Topic: Education


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