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Ryanair cancels some flights from and to Bratislava

The Irish low-cost airline publishes full list of cancellations

Irish budget airline Ryanair is believed to be cancelling up to 50 flights every day over the next six weeks because it "messed up" its pilots' holiday schedules. (Source: AP/SITA)

The low-cost airline Ryanair is cancelling 40-50 flights every day for the next six weeks due to what it calls “messed up” planning of pilot holidays. After pressure the airline published a full list of cancellations up until October 28 on the Ryanair website.

The airline said these cancellations have been allocated where possible, to Ryanair’s bigger base airports, and routes with multiple daily flights so that they can offer customers the maximum number of alternate flights and routes in order to minimise the disruption and inconvenience they experience. The most flights will be cancelled in London, Barcelona, Rome and Dublin.

Read also: Read also:Ryanair changes transport conditions for luggage from November onwards

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Some flights will also be cancelled to and from Bratislava. Ryanair flights from and to London Stansted scheduled for September 25, and October 2, 9, 16 and 23 are all cancelled, as are flights to and from Berlin scheduled for September 24.

“While over 98 percent of our customers will not be affected by these cancellations over the next six weeks, we apologise unreservedly to those customers whose travel will be disrupted, and assure them that we have done our utmost to try to ensure that we can re-accommodate most of them on alternative flights on the same or next day,” said chief executive Michael O'Leary as cited by a press release.

Customers affected by the cancellations will be emailed with offers of alternative flights or full refunds, and details of their EU261 compensation entitlement

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