Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

7 things people believe about business service centres

Which stereotypes about BSCs are true and which are just myths?

BSCs are more than just call centres, contrary to popular belief.(Source: Fotolia)

Despite their increasing influence on Slovakia’s economy, the public often does not understand what people working at business service centres, or shared service centres, are actually doing at their jobs and what their prospects for a future career are.

The Slovak Spectator interviewed leaders of the biggest business service centres (BSCs) in Bratislava, confronting them with some of the most common myths about the work in their sector.

1. I’m too creative for a BSC job

The leaders of service centres stress that BSCs are no longer just the call centres most of them were in the 1990s. At the same time, they admit part of the job covers just transactional activities. The leaders of BSCs agree it is around 20-30 percent of their jobs.

Read more: Are BSCs only for graduates with no experience? Is there any career growth expected? Will BSCs leave Slovakia one day to move to lower-cost countries?

The rest of this article is premium content at Spectator.sk
Subscribe now for full access

I already have subscription - Sign in

Subscription provides you with:
  • Immediate access to all locked articles (premium content) on Spectator.sk
  • Special weekly news summary + an audio recording with a weekly news summary to listen to at your convenience (received on a weekly basis directly to your e-mail)
  • PDF version of the latest issue of our newspaper, The Slovak Spectator, emailed directly to you
  • Access to all premium content on Sme.sk and Korzar.sk

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

We will not allow Ján and Martina to be forgotten

Statement from Slovak journalists half a year after the murder of Ján Kuciak and Martina Kušnírová

Illustrative stock photo

Yuri Dojc: I did not want to live under occupation

Slovakia is not even close to what I remember from my life here, says the Canadian-Slovak photographer.

Yuri Dojc today: "A reflection of an older man in the mirror with glimpse of an attractive woman , who is my wife"

Our emigrants’ stories: lessons in humanity

Slovaks who fled the 1968 occupation tell us what it means to be a refugee.

Pictures from The Gift pantomime show. Milan Sladek wrote it in the Swedish Goteborg in 1969 as a metaphor of Czechoslovakia's cohabitation with the Soviet Union.

We were on the run, but we were welcomed Photo

Slovak-Swiss writer Irena Brežná was forced to emigrate but found a way to fill her life with meaning in a foreign land.

Irena Brežná arrives to Switzerland.