More free Slovak language courses for non-EU foreigners

The courses are for beginners and pre-intermediate speakers.

(Source: Sme)

The Migration Information Centre (MIC) of the International Organisation for Migration (IOM) will begin another round of free Slovak language lessons for foreigners coming from outside the EU in Bratislava (May 15) and Košice (June 4). The courses, due to take place in the afternoons and evenings, are meant for beginners and pre-intermediate speakers, the TASR newswire reported.

Lessons for beginners in the capital will take place each Tuesday and Thursday at the C.S. Lewis High School in Bratislava-Petržalka, with lessons for pre-intermediates each Wednesday at the same school.

Read also:Free Info Days for foreigners relaunched Read more 

Meanwhile, Open Courses for the Slovak language in Košice will take place each Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, based on the schedule published on the mic.iom.sk website.

The courses are meant for all citizens of non-EU countries who are holders of permanent, temporary or tolerated residence permits in Slovakia and for people of any age. The courses, which are free of charge, include lessons on social and cultural orientation, the IOM informed.

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