A happy marriage? Both simpler, and tougher, than we realize

If experience is the mother of wisdom, why aren’t second and third marriages more successful?

Take a look back on how little you knew when you first got married: heart full of romantic bromides, head convinced that the statistics don’t apply, because the two of you are exceptional.Take a look back on how little you knew when you first got married: heart full of romantic bromides, head convinced that the statistics don’t apply, because the two of you are exceptional. (Source: SITA/AP)

We all know what a bad marriage looks like, it seems, and if prodded could summon a parade of marital sins.

Insouciance for the other, or for the undertaking; disloyalty in the face of misfortune, misery or monotony; long silences; sulking and punishing each other for petty grievances. “A bleak and eternal contest”, as US writer Scott Turow soberingly put it, “with each partner holding the other responsible for his or her deepest unhappiness.”

We are less sure, however, when it comes to good marriages. It’s not just that the things driving couples apart are usually more apparent that the bonds that hold them together; it’s that achieving happiness is so much more than ticking the right boxes with each other (good communicator, easy-going, warm, etc.). If we knew what to do to fix our relationships or make better choices in our partners, presumably, we would do it.

A risky venture

Just how risky a venture is marriage these days? According to statistics, plenty – around half of first marriages in the US end in divorce, with the failure rate rising to two-thirds for second marriages and almost 75 percent of third marriages.

The greater fragility of successive marriages, by the way, is not an anomaly but goes to the core of the problem. Half of those first marriages break up despite all the glue holding them together (finances, social and professional standing, the emotional health of the family members). So how many of those marriages that do survive can be considered truly happy? How many couples stay together merely because separating is only marginally more painful? And for people who remarry, why is prior experience so little help to them in avoiding divorce once again?

The rest of this article is premium content at Spectator.sk
Subscribe now for full access

I already have subscription - Sign in

Subscription provides you with:
  • Immediate access to all locked articles (premium content) on Spectator.sk
  • Special weekly news summary + an audio recording with a weekly news summary to listen to at your convenience (received on a weekly basis directly to your e-mail)
  • PDF version of the latest issue of our newspaper, The Slovak Spectator, emailed directly to you
  • Access to all premium content on Sme.sk and Korzar.sk

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

Threats have worked. People queued for COVID testing before the official start

The nationwide testing in Slovakia started with four districts in the north. Here is a report from the first day in Orava.

Bardejov

Day two of pilot testing in hardest-hit regions is off to a smoother start

PM Igor Matovič and Health Minister Marek Krajčí are helping the sampling teams, too.

Trstená, the Tvrdošín district

No test, no work. Employees will have to take paid or unpaid leave

Those who will be quarantined with a positive test result will be entitled to pandemic sick leave.

Illustrative stock photo

Autumn holidays change, art schools close too

The ministry will contribute to schools to buy computers and other equipment for distance learning.

Illustrative stock photo