U.S. Steel does not plan to leave Košice

It is even considering new investments.

U.S. Steel Košice(Source: Courtesy of USSK)

U.S. Steel is satisfied in Košice and is considering further investments in its local plant. For now, it does not plan to leave the city, said Slovak Deputy PM Richard Raši, following his meeting with U.S. Steel top management in Pittsburgh.

“U.S. Steel is the biggest employer in Košice and one of the biggest employers in Slovakia,” Raši said, as quoted by the TASR newswire. “It is an absolutely stable partner.”

Read also:U.S. Steel Košice has record profits

The company is currently doing well in Slovakia and is considering further investments, which might include the expansion of its capacities.

Problems with emissions and costs

Raši discussed the company’s problems at the meeting with the steelworks’ president and CEO David D. Burritt and Košice-based plant’s head Scott D. Buckis.

“These concern mostly emissions, and we talked about costs for labour force and utilities,” Raši said, as quoted by TASR.

The government will do everything to help employers like U.S. Steel within its legal possibilities, he added.

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