R. Fico: A sack of potatoes could defeat Kotleba

But why use potatoes if you can join forces to achieve your goals?

Former PM Robert Fico congratulates Prime Minister Peter Pellegrini for winning support for his cabinet in parliament.Former PM Robert Fico congratulates Prime Minister Peter Pellegrini for winning support for his cabinet in parliament. (Source: TASR)

When the extremist People's Party - Our Slovakia (ĽSNS) succeeded in the last elections to parliament, Robert Fico, leader of the ruling party Smer, boasted that 'My government is the dam against extremism.'

But as soon as Fico and his party needed votes to push their interests forward, the extremist MP Marian Kotleba and his party the ĽSNS came in handy. Political analysts Pavol Baboš and Aneta Világi agree that Smer's relationship with the extremists is, above all, driven by pragmatism.

A sack of potatoes

"Even a sack of potatoes could defeat Mr Kotleba," said Fico about the ĽSNS leader in November 2013. At that time, Smer's nominee Vladimír Maňka, alongside Kotleba, had made it to the second round of the regional elections.

The rest of this article is premium content at Spectator.sk
Subscribe now for full access

I already have subscription - Sign in

Subscription provides you with:
  • Immediate access to all locked articles (premium content) on Spectator.sk
  • Special weekly news summary + an audio recording with a weekly news summary to listen to at your convenience (received on a weekly basis directly to your e-mail)
  • PDF version of the latest issue of our newspaper, The Slovak Spectator, emailed directly to you
  • Access to all premium content on Sme.sk and Korzar.sk

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Theme: Strana Kotleba - ĽSNS

Read more articles by the topic

Top stories

How a Catholic charity became a voice for migrants in Slovakia

Religious organisations have added leverage in changing perceptions of foreigners and migrants, says Caritas Slovakia.

Caritas Slovakia's ‘World Without “the Other” – Migration Myths’ campaign educates Slovaks on migration in a fun and artistic way.

Secret votes and public lies

There are uncanny echoes today of Slovakia’s agonies over its choice of chief prosecutor ten years ago.

Dobroslav Trnka (left) and Jozef Čentéš (right), the candidate who was eventually selected by MPs in 2011, never got to take up the post because the then president, Ivan Gašparovič refused to appoint him for reasons that were never clearly explained.

Which are the largest law firms in Slovakia?

For the first time, the ranking also provides an overview in partial categories of law.