SPECTACULAR SLOVAKIA PODCAST

What do Slovakia and Scandinavia have in common?

It has something to do with four articular Lutheran churches in Slovakia.

The articular Lutheran church in Kežmarok. The articular Lutheran church in Kežmarok. (Source: Peter Dlhopolec)

As the reformation movement expanded across Europe in the 16th and 17th centuries, the Catholic Habsburg empire, which included Slovakia, began to oppress Protestants. Although reluctantly, Emperor Leopold I eventually allowed them to build their churches under strict conditions scribbled in Article 25 and 26.

Listen to the episode:

Protestant Scandinavians are believed to have helped build the articular Lutheran churches in Slovakia. Although there are only a few today, Sunday church service, weddings and baptisms are still held in these churches.

Listen to Spectacular Slovakia podcast via:

The Spectacular Slovakia travel podcast is the latest addition to our range of travel-related products. This programme is part of The Slovak Spectator subscription, and our readers receive it every Thursday morning as part of their subscription.

More information:
Print+audio: shop.spectator.sme.sk/newspaper
Online+audio: www.sme.sk/predplatne-spectator

Top stories

President Zuzana Caputova delivers her state of the republic address in parliament on September 27, 2021.

President Čaputová: We need to protect this world and Slovakia's place in it

In her speech about the state of the republic, the president offered a grim summary of the pandemic so far. Slovakia is in desperate need of stability.


37m
Ahmedur Rashid Chowdhury (aka Tutul)

Bratislava reminds me of Bangladesh, says exiled writer

Ahmedur Rashid Chowdhury calls on the Slovak capital to help exiled writers and artists work through their trauma.


6 h

News digest: Fear of Covid vaccines behind low vaccination rate in Slovakia

PM does not expect national emergency to be declared. Romania toughens up rules for incomers from Slovakia. President will present her state of the republic address.


18 h
Most Slovak believe that “we” should also include foreigners, although they are quick to point out that efforts to integrate should be undertaken mainly by the foreigners themselves.

What Slovaks shouldn’t forget when they dream of the perfect foreigner

Bratislava’s mayor is right that integration is a two-way street, but even the capital still has some way to go to see foreigners as residents rather than just visitors.


22 h
Skryť Close ad