Poll: Sieť would take 24.6 percent of OĽaNO’s 2012 voters

THE EMERGING Sieť (i.e. Network) party started by Radoslav Procházka would take 24.6 percent of Ordinary People and Independent Personalities’ (OĽaNO) voters who supported the latter party in the 2012 general election. This stems from a public opinion poll conducted by the Polis Slovakia agency for the SITA newswire. Sieť would also take about 13.9 percent of voters of the ruling Smer party and 10 percent of the opposition Christian-Democratic Movement’s (KDH) support.

THE EMERGING Sieť (i.e. Network) party started by Radoslav Procházka would take 24.6 percent of Ordinary People and Independent Personalities’ (OĽaNO) voters who supported the latter party in the 2012 general election. This stems from a public opinion poll conducted by the Polis Slovakia agency for the SITA newswire. Sieť would also take about 13.9 percent of voters of the ruling Smer party and 10 percent of the opposition Christian-Democratic Movement’s (KDH) support.

The poll was carried out over the phone between May 26 and June 2 on 1,603 respondents and shows that Sieť would garner 15.4 of the vote in a parliamentary election (luring 27 percent of people who did not vote in the last election). Sieť would win over 9.1 percent of Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) voters, 8.2 percent of Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) voters, 1.8 percent of Most-Híd voters, and 1.7 percent of Slovak National Party (SNS) voters. Sieť would also take 3.7 percent of the votes for other political parties. Preferences were calculated from a turnout at 58 percent. In total, 16 percent of respondents were undecided, while 26 percent were undecided.

Smer, with 36.4 percent of vote, would lead the race, followed by Sieť with 15.4 percent; the KDH with 8.1 percent; Most-Híd with 7.6 percent; OĽaNO with 6.2 percent and the Party of Hungarian Community (SMK) with 5.7 percent. The SDKÚ (with 4.7 percent of the vote), SaS (4.3 percent), SNS (3.9 percent), NOVA (3.4 percent) People’s Party-Our Slovakia (ĽS-NS, 2 percent) and the Communist Party (one percent) would not exceed the five-percent threshold necessary to gain seats in parliament.

(Source: SITA)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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