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Crown sets new record, then steadies below Sk31.50 per euro

The Slovak crown strengthened on May 19 to a new record of Sk31.47 per euro before stabilising under the level of Sk31.50 per euro.

The Slovak crown strengthened on May 19 to a new record of Sk31.47 per euro before stabilising under the level of Sk31.50 per euro.

Trading began positively on May 19, Tatra Banka dealer Boris Somorovský told the TASR newswire. In the morning, the crown opened at 31.510/31.540 SKK/EUR, while subsequent bids from banks moved it to its new record level of Sk31.47 per euro. Shortly after 11 a.m., it stood at 31.480/31.510 SKK/EUR.

Somorovský believes that investors are currently trying to push the crown towards a new threshold of Sk31.30 per euro, which would suit most of the players on the market. The dealer therefore expects the crown to move within a range of Sk31.30-31.65/EUR over the next few days. TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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