From Tudor to Locusta

The Museum of Transport has opened a new exhibition of various automobiles produced in the former Czechoslovakia, outlining the evolution of car-making industry from the Second World War to late 1980s.

(Source: Courtesy of Museum of Transport)

The Museum of Transport has opened a new exhibition of various automobiles produced in the former Czechoslovakia, outlining the evolution of car-making industry from the Second World War to late 1980s.

The oldest model, a two-door Tudor, comes from 1946, when the Škoda automobile factory in Mladá Boleslav was opened. Its successors, the legendary Felicia, Garde or Rapid, can also be seen at the exhibition.

Apart from these popular models, the display also features a prototype of a three-door Locusta that never went into production. The coupe with front-wheel drive and the motor in the front was designed in 1980s, but technical problems hampered its further development.

And the icing on the cake, as organisers say, is a Škoda 130 RS, a famed racing car that helped many racers to victory at numerous rallies in Czechoslovakia and abroad.

From Tudor to Locusta is available until June 30, 2009.

The Museum of Transport
Šancová 1/A, Bratislava
Open daily except Monday from 10:00 to 17:00
www.muzeumdopravy.com

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