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Consumption exceeds production

SLOVAKIA is consuming more electricity than it produces. In 2012 it generated almost 28,400 GWh of power, but consumption was nearly 28,800 GWh, the SITA newswire wrote, citing data provided by grid operator Slovak Electricity Transmission System (SEPS).

SLOVAKIA is consuming more electricity than it produces. In 2012 it generated almost 28,400 GWh of power, but consumption was nearly 28,800 GWh, the SITA newswire wrote, citing data provided by grid operator Slovak Electricity Transmission System (SEPS).

Last year the total installed capacity of power stations in Slovakia exceeded 8,400 MW, of which hydropower stations accounted for the biggest portion, 2,500 MW.

Nuclear power stations followed, with aggregate installed capacity of over 1,900 MW. The installed capacity of natural-gas powered stations amounted to over 1,500 MW.

Photovoltaic power stations contributed to the production of electricity last year too. Their aggregate installed capacity was 524 MW, making up the biggest portion of renewable energy sources. Power stations generating electricity via biomass followed, with installed capacity of almost 170 MW.

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