Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

FOCUS SHORT

Telephone boxes disappearing

MOBILE phones are pushing public telephone boxes off Slovakia’s streets. Telecom operator Slovak Telekom (ST), which operates the network of public phones, is gradually decreasing the number of public telephones, with plans to keep only those that are used the most and in places with limited access to mobile operators’ services, ST announced in early April.

MOBILE phones are pushing public telephone boxes off Slovakia’s streets. Telecom operator Slovak Telekom (ST), which operates the network of public phones, is gradually decreasing the number of public telephones, with plans to keep only those that are used the most and in places with limited access to mobile operators’ services, ST announced in early April.

The Slovak telecom market regulator, the Telecommunications Regulatory Authority, cancelled Slovak Telekom’s duty to operate public telephone boxes as of last August, largely due to an increase in the usage of mobile services across Slovakia.

At the end of 2012 there were 3,129 public phones in operation, many of which sat unused throughout the whole year. The average monthly revenue per telephone box is about €2, which far from covers the costs of maintenance and repairing damage inflicted on them.

ST plans to keep about 200 public phones located in hospitals, prisons, refugee camps and other places. The removal of unused public phones started in March.

Topic: IT


Top stories

Ecological sunscreen and air pollution monitoring among the projects of Slovak high-schoolers

Leaf organization awarded the best projects by Slovak students.

Filip Geib, Emanuel Kucbel and Peter Škripko

Prosecutor’s office: Reporter’s murder investigation had some flaws

The lawyer of the journalist’s parents fears information leakage to Police Corps officers.

Commemorating Ján Kuciak and Martina Kušnírová at protests

Prosecutor withdraws charges of libel against journalist

The journalist originally received an 18-month suspended sentence with three years of probation.

The CT scanner scandal cost Pavol Paška his post as speaker of parliament.

Several Christians disagree with Church’s stance towards extremists

The extremist ĽSNS party drafted a bill limiting abortions in Slovakia, creating an awkward situation for the Church.

Illustrative stock photo