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MP Fedor disapproves of proposed changes to SIS

The working draft of a law on the Slovak Intelligence Service (SIS) proposes to change the agency's name to the Office of the Civil Intelligence Service, and expands the powers of the prime minister, the head of the parliamentary defence and security committee, MP Martin Fedor (Slovak Democratic and Christian Union), informed the TASR newswire on Thursday, May 9, adding that he disliked all of the proposed changes.

The working draft of a law on the Slovak Intelligence Service (SIS) proposes to change the agency's name to the Office of the Civil Intelligence Service, and expands the powers of the prime minister, the head of the parliamentary defence and security committee, MP Martin Fedor (Slovak Democratic and Christian Union), informed the TASR newswire on Thursday, May 9, adding that he disliked all of the proposed changes.

“According to this draft, intelligence services will get the power to conduct also other measures and operations that can exceed the limit of the powers which are specifically stipulated,” Fedor said. “The contents and extent of the tasks are unclear, worded too generally – basically without any limitations. And it puts the power in the hands of the prime minister,” MP concluded.

He opines that the new powers of the prime minister would enable the head of the cabinet to personally decide on the so-called intelligence protection of any person located in Slovakia and abroad. “In fact, anything can be hidden under the pretence of intelligence protection,” Fedor said, adding that the proposed law introduces powers for the intelligence service to “execute other tasks in a crisis situation”. He stressed that the draft does not clarify what is included in the phrases “other tasks” or “crisis situation”. Fedor also pointed out that changing the name of the intelligence service usually indicates a change of political regime, changes within the service itself.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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