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Police raid Bašternák’s premises

The raid reportedly pertains to the company connected to the interior minister.

Illustrative stock photo(Source: SME)

The National Criminal Agency (NAKA) raided the premises at Tupého Street in Bratislava, owned by businessman Ladislav Bašternák based on an order from the prosecutor, the Aktuality.sk website reported.

The police officers allegedly also raided his house under Slavín memorial, though no cars are visible in front of the building.

“We can confirm they are securing documents in order to check the published information in this matter, which we will not comment on further,” spokesperson for the Special Prosecutor’s Office Jana Tökölyová told Aktuality.sk.

Read also: Read also:Kaliňák’s scandal has not harmed Smer

The police officers are reportedly searching for the accountancy documents of Bašternák’s firms. The raid pertains to checking the information about company B.A. Haus, in which also Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák owned shares, according to Aktuality.sk.

No criminal prosecution has been launched in the matter yet.

Read also: Read also:Protesters again call for Kaliňák to resign

Meanwhile, four opposition MPs gave testimony to NAKA: head of the Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO-NOVA) Igor Matovič, Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) chair Richard Sulík, Daniel Lipšic of OĽaNO-NOVA and SaS MP Jozef Rajtár. They were described as whistleblowers in the case as they had reported about the bank transfers between company B.A. Haus, Kaliňák and also former transport minister Ján Počiatek.

The transfers were noticed by Filip Rybanič, Rajtár’s assistant who at the time also worked for Tatra Banka. The police have already accused him of violating bank secrecy.

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