Slovak company joins forces with Europol’s cybercrime centre

ESET’s researcher will represent the Slovak cyber-security company at the Europol advisory group on internet security.

Illustrative stock photoIllustrative stock photo (Source: AP/TASR)

Slovak security company ESET has become a member of the Europol advisory group on internet security, with the firm due to be represented in the group by ESET researcher Righard Zwienenberg.

The group is part of the European Cybercrime Center, founded by Europol to protect European citizens, firms and organisations from online attackers, the TASR newswire wrote on July 18.

“The goal of ESET is to protect the hundreds of millions of its users and also educate and raise awareness of cyber security,” Zwienenberg said, as quoted by TASR. “Whenever appropriate opportunities present themselves, we join forces with law enforcement bodies to help catch cyber criminals. As of now, we’ll be better prepared to counsel the group, which will utilise our information and knowledge in order to protect internet users and fight cyber groups.”

Zwienenberg is himself a native of The Hague where Europol has its headquarters.

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