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Ryanair strike will affect flights from Bratislava

The airline will cancel two flights.

Ryanair plane, illustrative stock photo(Source: SME)

Irish low-cost airline Ryanair has cancelled two flights between Bratislava and Brussels scheduled for Friday, August 10 due to a strike among pilots.

As a result, there will be no plane from the Brussels-Charleroi airport with the scheduled arrival to Bratislava at 12:00 and no plane to Brussels-Charleroi with the scheduled departure from the Slovak capital at 12:50.

“Other flights will follow the flight schedule for now,” Bratislava airport’s spokesperson Veronika Ševčíková told the TASR newswire.

The August 10 strike was announced by Swedish, Belgian and Irish pilots working for Ryanair, which resulted in Ryanair’s decision to cancel 146 of 2,400 scheduled flights. Since German pilots joined them on August 8, the carrier cancelled another 250 flights.

Passengers affected by the cancellation of the flights can rebook their plane tickets or get their money back, as reported by TASR.

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Topic: Bratislava


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