Robots can replace Slovaks at work

Industrial robots are likely to take over some jobs.

Robots assemble vehicles in the carmaker Kia Motors Slovakia.Robots assemble vehicles in the carmaker Kia Motors Slovakia.(Source: Sme)

Slovaks should prepare for the arrival of robots. With the increasing use of industrial robots across the globe, an average worker in Slovakia faces a 62 percent median probability that his or her job will be automated “in the near future”, the Bloomberg news agency reported, citing the study published by the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD).

In a report, which compared 11 emerging countries with developed economies, EBRD wrote that workers in Lithuania are only slightly less at risk, and the chance hovers at around a coin toss for employees in Slovenia, Poland, the Czech Republic and Estonia. Robots will be most used in textiles, agriculture and manufacturing, the report reads.

Slovakia already has the highest share of industrial robots against the number of workers in Europe. There has been an increase in the number of robots between 1993 and 2016 by nine robots per one thousand workers, the SITA newswire reported.

A more dynamic growth has been observed only in Germany and Sweden.

Read also:German investors keep coming to Slovakia, bringing more automation Read more 

The textile industry, food production, agriculture and wood processing are most exposed to automation. On the other hand, education, telecommunications, IT, and various financial and legal services are amongst the sectors the least likely to be influenced by automation, according to the EBRD report.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Theme: Industry


Top stories

PM Pellegrini survives no-confidence vote

The session was finally held after several unsuccessful attempts.

Prime Minister Peter Pellegrini during the parliamentary session on September 13, during which MPs backed the proposal for a vote of no confidence against him.

Nobelist: Molecular machines can work like smart drugs

In science things often go wrong, sometimes for a long time, but these failures can lead to something beautiful, says 2016 Nobel Prize Laureate Ben Feringa.

Ben Feringa during a lecture at the Comenius University. He visited Slovakia at the invitation of the Slovak Chemical Society at the Slovak Academy of Sciences (SAV) and his stay was supported by Comenius University in Bratislava, the Embassy of the Netherlands to Slovakia and the ESET Foundation within the ESET Science Award project.

UK government launches a campaign before Brexit

The new campaign informs the public about specific actions they need to take to secure their rights and services in their host country.

A Pro EU protestor holds balloons opposite parliament in London, on September 9, 2019. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson voiced optimism on the same day that a new Brexit deal can be reached so Britain leaves the European Union by October 31.

Most-Híd is losing MPs

Party chair Béla Bugár has rejected claims about the decay.

Béla Bugár