Veľká Fatra Mountains: Slovak treasure

What gems does the mountain range hide?

(Source: One2We)

"After all... tomorrow is another day," said Scarlett O'Hara, and with flaming eyes gazed in the future.

As Josephine Cochrane did, as she invented the first commercially successful automatic dishwasher.

And what would the modern mother do without a waterproof disposable diaper, the invention of Marion Donovan.

In a visit to New York City in the winter of 1902, in a trolley car on a frosty day, Mary Anderson observed that the motorman drove with both panes of the double front window open because of difficulty keeping the windshield clear of falling sleet. In November 1903, Anderson was granted her first patent for an automatic car window cleaning device controlled from inside the car, called the windshield wiper.

Through the years, women from different generations and locations have proven their strength and independence.

And Izabela Textorisová, the first Slovak female botanist, discovered on the Tlstá hill an interesting thistle, later named after her – Carduus Textorianus Marg. And a planet was named after her. And her portrait was placed on a stamp.

What can be found in Veľká Fatra?

Welcome to Veľká Fatra mountain range!

Blatnica village is located at its heart. The mountains are just a minute from Martin, just two minutes from Kremnica and 2.5 hours’ drive from Bratislava. Let’s explore its amazing history and treasures!

Discover Bronze and Stone Age artifacts, Celtic and Slavic settlements, the ruins of the Blatnica Castle from the 13th century, the museum of Karol Plicka, a famous photographer and ethnographer located in a Baroque-classicist manor house, a late Baroque manor house from the 18th century, traditional houses with arches, where producers of healing oils made from drug plants used to live.

Blatnica is the birthplace of Maša Haľamová, a Slovak poet. It was an asylum for partisans in the Slovak National Uprising during World War II.

Nowadays, the village is a fantastic starting point for many hiking and cycling routes. A hiking path of Janko Bojmír, named after the local activist and tourist guide, runs to Ostrá and Tlstá hills.

Ostrá and Tlstá

A hiking path through the rough forest bends near a stone cirque, the Mažarná Cave. In this 130m long fissure cave, Stone and Bronze Age people used to sit around the fire, the partisans used to hide during the Slovak National Uprising. And in winter, the chiropterans spend nights here.

Mud, stones and chains bring you to the deforested flat mountain, a plus-size-model Tlstá hill. A striking ridge with gorgeous views ends on Ostrá hill, a supermodel of the Veľká Fatra mountains. A break-neck hiking path with chains and wooden stairs, takes you to the top to see the sky above clouds. And on the road back, a Byron view, shows you the Tlstá hill again.

The Turiec region used to be characterized as a treasure of Slovakia. Is it so? Go and check it out yourself!

One2We is an incoming company concentrating on active, adventure, bike and sport tours in Slovakia, in the unique, authentic and safe country, far away from mass tourism; offer undiscovered and amazing places, tailored-made solutions and very professional individual guiding. For more information please visit: www.one2we.eu.

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