Slovak students will go on strike for the climate again

The protest takes place in three Slovak cities on September 20.

Slovak students protest against climate change in Zvolen, central Slovakia.Slovak students protest against climate change in Zvolen, central Slovakia.(Source: FFF Slovakia)

Slovak students will again walk out of their classrooms and head for the streets on Friday, September 20, to participate in the global climate strike, started off by the Fridays for Future (FFF) movement.

“For many critics, this approach is not understandable,” Emma Zajačková of the Fridays for Future Slovakia said in a statement. “For us, it is one of a few ways to make adults listen and act to save our future.”

To date, three protest events have been announced in Bratislava, Žilina, and Košice. All begin at 11:00.

Read alsoStrike for climate will continue after Easter Read more 

One Earth, one home

Organisers want to point out that climate change and the emerging collapse of ecosystems is a global issue, the consequences of which will impact future generations, including families, jobs and vulnerable social groups.

“There is only one Earth, and it is a home to all of us,” organisers said, as quoted in the statement.

Hence, they are calling on universities, firms, and individuals, regardless of their race, social status, sex, age, and other differences to participate in the protests and force politicians to take action, too.

“We want everyone to come to the squares on September 20, to change their lives and strike, not just after work,” Zajačková added.

September 23

Read alsoBratislava protested for the future of the climate Read more 

The Fridays for Future (FFF) movement announced that over 2,400 events will take place between September 20 and 27 around the world, but the number is said to be growing as the Week for Future event draws near.

The climax of the week is scheduled for September 23 when the UN Climate Action Summit takes place in New York City.

“We will be sending global leaders the message that our #houseisonfire and that we are calling on them to do what science is clearly telling us must be done,” the FFF wrote on its website.

Our time is nearly up, but we believe we still have hope for a planet where it will still be possible to live, Zajačková said.

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Theme: Bratislava


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