Burnt historic palace on Bratislava’s Main Square still waits for reconstruction

The secession style building was damaged by fire from an illegal food stall during last year’s Christmas market.

The burned facade of the secession style palace is hidden behind a textile copy of the original facade.The burned facade of the secession style palace is hidden behind a textile copy of the original facade.(Source: Jana Liptáková)

Renovation of the historic building on the Main Square in Bratislava, which was damaged at the end of November 2018 by fire, is still under preparation. Bratislava’s Regional Monuments Board has already approved an architectural study of the building renovation and the project documentation for renovation of the main facade affected by the fire according to Silvia Nosková Illášová, spokesperson of the building’s owner, the insurance company Kooperativa, informed the TASR newswire.

“We are currently completing the project implementation documentation for building renovation,” said Nosková Illášová. “The deadline for the reconstruction is dependent on the entire reconstruction process, which must be consistent with restoring this national cultural monument.”

In the spring, the building underwent a survey of the facade. Kooperativa is cooperating on the restoration of this cultural monument with Bratislava city council and Bratislava’s Regional Monuments Board.

Fire

Related articleA stall at Bratislava’s Christmas market caught fire Read more 

The fire broke out in the Main Square on the afternoon of November 28, 2018, in one of the stalls at the Christmas market and spread to the adjacent building. Later it was discovered that the stall was illegal. The damage was estimated at that time at more than €200,000.

History of the building

The former bank, Uhorská Eskontná a Zmenárenská Banka, constructed the building designed by Budapest architect Aladár in the secession style, as its representative seat in 1911. On the ground floor there was a banking hall with a high ceiling while on other floors were offices and apartments.

Related articleWhile Brussels is proud of one urinating boy, Manneken Pis, Bratislava has four. Read more 

The building is now known as Roland’s Palace, named after the famous Roland café on its ground floor that was established the 1970s. The café was named after the fountain in front of the building that dates back to 1572. It features a sculpture of Maximillian II von Habsburg but is nevertheless called the Roland Fountain after the famous knight.

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Theme: Bratislava


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