Slovaks more critical of the post-1989 world than Czechs

A third of Slovaks question the Velvet Revolution, a survey shows.

A photo portrays the atmosphere during the Velvet Revolution on November 17, 1989A photo portrays the atmosphere during the Velvet Revolution on November 17, 1989 (Source: TASR)

The fall of communism in November 1989 did not help everyone in Slovak society.

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The Velvet Revolution, in fact, brought about positive changes mostly for entrepreneurs, dissidents, young people, believers, and experts, a survey on November 1989 has shown, the SITA newswire reported.

The comparison of this year's surveys in Slovakia and the Czech Republic shows that Slovaks are indeed more critical when it comes to the assessment of changes after November 17, 1989: 56 percent of Slovaks see the revolution positively compared to 66 percent of Czechs.

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