Dubovcová spoke out even when they refused to listen

Slovakia needs someone who will not bend the definition of human rights depending on whom Robert Fico or Richard Sulík want to please.

Less than dozen MPs were listening to Obudswoman Jana Dubovcová when she was presenting her report in March 2015.Less than dozen MPs were listening to Obudswoman Jana Dubovcová when she was presenting her report in March 2015. (Source: Sme)

In times when politicians display their brownish opinions for everyone to see as a kind of new virtue, the country needs a determined public protector of rights. More than ever before.

It needs a counterweight to the hateful statements about those who are supposed to be incompatible with whatever the applauding majority labels as "our culture".

Slovakia needs someone who will not bend the definitions of human rights, those that still make us a democratic and European country, depending on whom Richard Sulík or Robert Fico want to please.

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We live in the times when they once again reach for collective guilt. With such ease as when someone self-prescribes a painkiller for chronic pain that only a positive vision for the country can heal. The brownish talk about "unadjustable Roma" or Muslim children of whom there should not be more than of the Slovak ones, will not heal the pains of Slovakia.

Ombudswoman Jana Dubovcová never stopped talking about the segregation of disadvantaged children, about inappropriate interventions of the police against Roma or about the politicians insufficiently condemning extremism, even though those who are in power refused to listen.

If the government replaces her with someone that lacks the determination to really protect the rights of the voiceless, then the country deliberately hands over another part of the public space to those who only see human rights as an obstacle. To their brownish success.

©Sme

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