Less money and missing links await expats upon return

Though life as a stranger in a foreign country is not easy, the return home also presents expats with certain obstacles, says Andrea Sadloňová, a returnee to Slovakia, in an interview.

Andrea Sadloňová(Source: Archive of A. Sadloňová)

Slovaks who decide to migrate abroad gain a major chance to know how the world operates, acquire experience and language skills. Though life as a stranger in a foreign country is not easy, the return home also presents expats with certain obstacles. Andrea Sadloňová has experienced them. She is a Slovak-born scientist who returned home after 19 years in the USA.

Read also:Migration finally reverses

The Slovak Spectator (TSS): Could you briefly explain your current situation, years abroad and reasons for your return?

Andrea Sadloňová (AS): I came back to Slovakia in 2015 after 19 years of study and work in the scientific field of Molecular Pathology of Cancer and Tumor Immunology in the US. Earlier in 2012, I had found a job at a company from Prague which needed to launch a branch in the US. At the beginning I worked overseas but later the company transferred me to Prague where I stayed for two years. Now I am back in Slovakia. It is easier to be with my family now without having to travel between Slovakia and Prague every weekend. When I left Slovakia after finishing high school at the age of 19, I wanted to study and fulfil my American dreams. Now I want to experience the comfort of European life with more time for hobbies and family.

TSS: You left Slovakia in 1996, seven years after the fall of the totalitarian regime. Why did you decide to emigrate?
AS:
I did not run away from anything. I just wanted to dedicate my life to science which was, according to my family members who spent years in the educational system, not possible in Slovakia at that time. I moved to the US with the goal of putting my signature under scientific articles and new discoveries. But I and many of my classmates from high school did not know where we were going.

Read more: Why did Sadlonova return? What difficulties she experienced? What are her recommendations for expats willing to return?

The rest of this article is premium content at Spectator.sk
Subscribe now for full access

I already have subscription - Sign in

Subscription provides you with:
  • Immediate access to all locked articles (premium content) on Spectator.sk
  • Special weekly news summary + an audio recording with a weekly news summary to listen to at your convenience (received on a weekly basis directly to your e-mail)
  • PDF version of the latest issue of our newspaper, The Slovak Spectator, emailed directly to you
  • Access to all premium content on Sme.sk and Korzar.sk

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Theme: Career and HR


Top stories

Deputy parliamentary speaker sent selfies to Alena Zs.

Yet another influential Smer politician, Martin Glváč, faces accusations of talking to Kočner's collaborator.

Igor Matovič of OĽaNO holds a picture of Martin Glváč (Smer).

Coalition demands the right of reply for politicians

Politicians ponder new provisions for the Press Code, Speaker of Parliament Danko wants to defend himself against op-eds too.

The ruling coalition (L-R: SNS-Andrej Danko, Smer-Robert Fico. Most-Híd-Béla Bugár).

UPDATED: More critical voices speak out against Danko’s doctoral dissertation

Three more academic institutions and the Slovak Academy of Sciences have supported the universities in their criticism of the paper and the actions of the current education minister.

Andrej Danko