Looking for hidden Easter eggs is not the Slovaks’ cup of tea

Slovaks perceive Easter as a primarily religious holiday.

(Source: AP/TASR)

Easter is the most important holiday in the Christian calendar. About 51 percent of Slovaks consider Easter as a religious holiday. One-third of people perceive it also as a feast of spring with many traditions, while almost one-fifth regard it as just a holiday without any special meaning.

This stems from a survey carried out by the Go4insight agency on 1,000 respondents aged between 15 to 79 years old.

Listen to our podcast:Spectacular Slovakia #31: A true Slovak Easter is not about whipping women Read more 

The perception of Easter is different for the various age groups of the respondents. Even though religious views on Easter prevail in all age groups, it becomes dominant for respondents aged 50+, and even more so for those older than 70.

“Younger people and middle-aged people tend to view Easter as a time for folk traditions or holidays,” Rastislav Kočan of the Go4insight agency said, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

Traditions for families with children

When it comes to regional differences, people from eastern Slovakia ascribe religious significance to the Easter holiday the most.

Read also:Will you get a cold shower or a whipping this Easter? Read more 

Various traditions are linked with Easter. The majority of respondents, about 70 percent, meet with their family and relatives, while 67 percent decorate their homes with Easter decorations and 66 percent prepare special Easter food and sweets.

About 44 percent of respondents go to church during the Easter holiday, while one-quarter paint Easter eggs, and 14 percent make a whip. These activities apply especially to families with children.

The tradition of looking for hidden Easter eggs that is popular in western Europe is not popular among Slovak people, since only 2 percent of Slovaks listed it among their traditions. About 6 percent of Slovaks do not follow any of the mentioned traditions, the survey suggests.

Young women do not like pouring water and whipping

“Pouring water” and “whipping” have a special position among Slovak Easter traditions. Almost two-fifths of respondents follow these traditions, especially people younger than 19 and families with children.

Read also:Blog: Easter Monday: What doesn't kill you makes you stronger Read more 

These traditions are perceived positively by 63 percent of Slovaks, mostly by men. However, women also have a positive attitude towards these two traditions, especially in the age group above 30 years, the survey showed.

Half of the girls under 19 are against this tradition. Women aged between 20 to 30 perceived the tradition negatively, TASR reported.

On the other hand, the most positive take on the tradition is among older people, especially from eastern Slovakia. Bratislavans support it less, but there are no significant differences between towns and villages, according to the survey.

Top stories

In the Tehelné Pole zone, the pilot parking policy will be replaced by the city-wide parking policy.

Bratislava gears up for city-wide parking policy

Parking will first be regulated only in parts of Nové Mesto and Rača boroughs.


14 h

News digest: Slovakia records highest number of positive cases since mid-April

Covid spreads mostly in schools. Bratislava ring road stretches to open on Sunday. Slovak water slalom athletes successful at world championships.


14 h
arrested Pavol Ďurka of NAKA specialised team Purgatory heading to Bratislava' district court.

How an anti-team dismantled an elite police team with the help of the secret service

Hints of a possible coalition break-up over rule of law not materialising for now.


21. sep
In this photo taken from video, Slovakia's President Zuzana Čaputová remotely addresses the 76th session of the United Nations General Assembly in a pre-recorded message, Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2021 at U.N. headquarters.

President to the UN Assembly: Where scientists succeeded, politics is still failing

Zuzana Čaputová recalled the words Pope Francis addressed to Slovak youth during his recent visit to Slovakia.


21 h
Skryť Close ad