Kočner worried he might end up in jail, decoded messages show

Kočner and Bödör discussed interfering with prosecution and their loyalty to Smer through Threema messages that have been published by Denník N.

Marian KočnerMarian Kočner (Source: TASR)

Marian Kočner, the man who stands accused of ordering the murder of Ján Kuciak and who will stand in front of the court in September in another case that might send him to prison for 20 years, worried about the future of Smer after the murder.

"We will all end up in jail," he wrote in text messages that he exchanged with several persons through the application for encrypted communication, Threema. That was the future he projected for himself and others around him unless the ruling Smer follows his plan to keep the party in power. This stems from a police report about the Threema communication from his smartphone that Denník N published on August 1.

Related articleThe ministry's inspectorate is looking into Kočner's links to police Read more 

The police have decoded the messages Kočner sent through the Threema application in May of this year, with the help of partners from Europol. Prosecutors used the messages that Kočner exchanged with Štefan Agh and Norbert Bödör during the trial in the promissory notes case, in which Kočner is one of the defendants.

The Threema messages were obtained from Kočner's phone, which was in the car that his former friend Peter Tóth submitted to the police. Tóth is a witness in the case of the murder of Ján Kuciak and Martina Kušnírová. Kočner is charged with ordering the murder of Kuciak. Tóth admitted to having conducted surveillance of several journalists, including Kuciak, upon order of Kočner.

Police link Bödör with screenings of journalists

"It is clear that Norbert Bödör repeatedly secured screenings in police records for Marian Kočner," the police reported about the communication between the two men, as quoted by Denník N. The daily noted that the police inspectorate is dealing with the screening allegations, and suspects former police corps president Tibor Gašpar of providing the information from the screenings.

The two men also messaged about the published media reports on the murder, and about the situation at the police, in the Slovak Information Service (SIS) and about manipulating criminal prosecution through police officers and through prosecutors, Denník N wrote.

Related articleFormer secret agents collect dirt on people and offer their services Read more 

Loyal to Fico and Smer

The police report from the communication between Kočner and Bödörom suggests they acted to the benefit of the ruling Smer.

"The communication suggests he is always ready to help Robert Fico, is loyal to him, sacrifices himself for Smer, proposes and takes steps for Smer to stay in power. He even uses his own money to influence the public's opinion through media, attempts to influence various political posts, which should also be done using information that he managed to get hold of even before they were reported by the media," Denník N cites from the report, which also names the politicians Kočner wanted to discredit the most: attorney Daniel Lipšic (now out of politics), Igor Matovič, Boris Kollár and Andrej Kiska.

Police Corps President Lučanský denies involvement

In one of the messages that Denník N published, Kočner checks with Bödör whether "the deal with Milan is on". The message was sent after Pavol Rusko, another defendant in the promissory notes case, was called to testify at the Police Inspectorate.

Related articleSix people involved in the surveillance of journalists, Kočner paid thousands Read more 

The inspectorate was then led by Milan Lučanský, who has since become the Police Corps president, in May 2018.

Lučanský denied any involvement. "If I were that Milan they are talking about, and if there was a deal like that, Kočner would not be in prison now, charged in several serious cases, and a defendant in the promissory notes case," he wrote on the official Facebook page of the police. He said he never had lunch with Bödör. In the communication, Kočner and Bödör discuss the latter would go to lunch with Lučanský.

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